Re: 110V to 220V

From: Harvey Muzina <voidspam_at_yahoo.co.nz>
Date: Mon, 11 May 2015 02:46:14 +0000 (UTC)
Message-ID: <1116022897.4721905.1431312374524.JavaMail.yahoo@mail.yahoo.com>
>> It claims 500W, which is more than a C900 or C720 needs. Do you think
>> somehing like this would work?
 > If it's the kind with a big, heavy transformer inside it should work. 
> You will get 220V 60Hz though. Usually that's not a problem. Unless your 
> system uses the line frequence for something.

When getting one of these transformers there are two things to consider:
1. Transformer needs to be rated to handle peak draw of your equipment, not average one.  That usually means draw on start up.  Safe rule of thumb is to check what your equipment rating is (everything you plan to run at the same time from that transformer) and multiply it by 2.5.
2. Only voltage gets stepped up or down, not frequency.  That goes beyond just whether your equipment uses line frequency but has implications for how the equipment is built.  For higher frequency you can get away with smaller transformer/lower grade steel (http://electricity2all.blogspot.co.nz/2013/05/can-we-connect-50-hz-appliance-to-60-hz.html), which is why 220V/50Hz equipment often costs more than 110V/60Hz version (everything else being equal).  Since you're taking 220V/50Hz equipment into 110V/60Hz zone you should be good, but if you ever move back think carefully if any of your new 110V/60Hz stuff is worth bringing back into 220V/50Hz zone. Anything that has a motor needs to be checked -- if it has a universal motor it's fine (http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/118027/running-brushed-universal-motor-at-different-frequency-than-designed); anything with induction motor is not a good candidate (http://www.brighthubengineering.com/diy-electronics-devices/46495-can-a-motor-be-run-on-lowerhigher-than-rated-frequency/).  So, if anyone in your family cares about baking, you can safely buy cheap 110V/60Hz KitchenAid mixers (which have universal motors that will happily run on 50 Hz or 60 Hz) and use them anywhere in the world (with a help of a beefy step up/down transformer) rather than buying ridiculously overpriced 220Hz/50Hz ones. :)



     On Monday, 11 May 2015 7:09 AM, Gerrit Heitsch <gerrit@laosinh.s.bawue.de> wrote:
   

 On 05/10/2015 08:54 PM, MichaŇā Pleban wrote:
> Hello!
>
> Since I will be moving out of the country, I need to find a way to power
> my 220V machines off 110V.
>
> I have found something like this in Google:
>
> http://www.batterycity.ie/revolta-500w-voltage-converter-transformer-110v-220v-and-220v-110v-5584
>
> It claims 500W, which is more than a C900 or C720 needs. Do you think
> somehing like this would work?

If it's the kind with a big, heavy transformer inside it should work. 
You will get 220V 60Hz though. Usually that's not a problem. Unless your 
system uses the line frequence for something.

I still use one of those to power my 110V Weller 921Z in 220V country.

Before using make sure you set the switch correctly!

  Gerrit



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